Ken Storey

Ken Storey is an otherwise unknown professor at the University of Tampa.  He apparently doesn’t like conservatives, or Republicans, or people who are not socialists.  Witnessing the atrocities hurricane Harvey was inflicting on people of all political beliefs and affiliations, he had those reassuring words to offer.

And, not to be outdone, took it up a notch to include people who haven’t suffered yet:

He very quickly took it down AFTER his employer strongly condemned his tweets:

So, who here feels like I do?  I’m sick and tired of people accusing innocents of hate while hating overtly and publicly.  The original post was Ken Storey being honest.  He truly thinks people who voted against his preferred candidate should suffer horribly.  That’s hate people.  Assuming someone else does because you don’t agree with them isn’t.  You just don’t get much more hate filled than what Ken Storey said.  the University of Tampa has a choice to make.  They show people they don’t tolerate hate and do something about it.  Or, they can show people that they do tolerate hate and keep him.  That’s their choice.  Hate can’t be tolerated as long as you agree with it.  If people want it to go away, they have to get rid of their own first.

Next day update: The University of Tampa has fired Ken Storey.

University spokesman Eric Cardenas said in a statement Tuesday that Storey was fired after the school weathered an outpouring of online outrage over the comments.

Good.  This guy doesn’t need to be anywhere near kids.

Hurricane Gert

Check out the path Hurricane Gert took.

Now, a quick question: How many people can name at least one of the previous seven named storms this year?

Yup, most people missed eight big storms so far this year.  Gert would be the eighth.

My gripe has been storms are too easily “named”.  A storm that spins in a little circle then peters out is not something that should have ever been named.  But, because of better technology, storms get named all the time.  Because of that, we need to redefine how hurricanes are named.

This probably wouldn’t mean anything at all if SOME people didn’t run around yelling how all these “record” hurricane seasons were a vindication of Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth.

We’re not having “record” hurricane seasons, we’re having “record” hurricane naming seasons.  That is all.

Keeping an eye on the sun

I asked a question on August 24, 2005.  It was a simple question.  It was largely ignored.

How will this affect Katrina and the waves?

Now, when I asked the question, Katrina was barely a named storm.  I like keeping an eye on two things this time of the year, hurricanes and solar storms.  So, I noticed something was happening on the Sun.  Namely this:

Within a couple of days, Katrina would be a category five monster that pretty much destroyed a good part of New Orleans. Let’s fast forward two years almost to the day and see what the Sun’s up to now:

Not quite as active, but coming around the corner is a pretty good blast. However, according to NOAA, no hurricane activity is expected within the next 48 hours. So, maybe this year we’ll get a pass.

Or, the NOAA may get a surprise. We’ll see. My “bet” right now is there is nothing for this little sunburst to excite, which is a good thing.

2006 Hurricane Season

“For the 2006 North Atlantic hurricane season, NOAA is predicting 13 to 16 named storms, with eight to 10 becoming hurricanes, of which four to six could become ‘major’ hurricanes of Category 3 strength or higher,” said retired Navy Vice Adm. Conrad C. Lautenbacher, administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Now, this is where the story gets weird:

U.S. hurricane experts say a sharp rise in Atlantic storm activity since about 1995 is related to a natural shift in climatic conditions and sea surface temperatures in the Atlantic that is expected to last from 15 to 40 years.

That part I’ve been hollering about here for a long time.  This part caught me off guard:

Some climatologists however say there are indications that human-induced global warming could be increasing the average intensity of tropical cyclones, although there is no evidence to date that it is affecting the number of hurricanes.

Wow.  Someone stating it as it is.  Don’t see that often enough.  Especially considering the media attention people like Al Gore get:

The United States is emerging from a “bubble of unreality” about the problem of global warming, former Vice President Al Gore said Saturday at the Cannes Film Festival.

Gore was in Cannes to promote the documentary “An Inconvenient Truth,” which chronicles his efforts to bring the dangers of climate change to greater attention.

What does Gore use as a backdrop to promote his new movie?

A “man-made” hurricane that destroyed New Orleans and killed 1,300 people of course.  He then promptly hopped into cars with his entourage to drive 500 feet.  Make no mistake about it, I think the climate is changing.  However, I don’t believe Al Gore and mankind can stick their finger in a dyke and stop it.  It’s been changing for all of time, and it will continue to do so.  What we need to be doing is figuring how to live with it.  That article IMO is what we need to be knowing.  Hurricanes are not a rare phenomena, but a natural part of the Earth’s climate and an important one as well ( see Somalia for reasons why ).  People like Al Gore are distracting the real message that needs to be delivered and heard.  We’re not going to stop catastrophic hurricanes.  If we did, it would cause other catastrophes.  What we need to do is stop overbuilding where we know hurricanes are prone to hit.  It’s that simple folks.

Forget about Katrina…..

If you look over up there right now ( 8/24/05), you’ll see a storm the makes Katrina look like a small cloud burst.

Now, this has the possibilty of disrupting radio communications, cell phones, etc.. Now, what I am wondering is, according to a lot of things I’ve read, solar activity directly affects Earth’s weather patterns.  How will this affect Katrina and the waves?


4/20/2017 Editor’s note:  This is a post from 8/25/2005.  Katrina was a fairly powerful hurricane meandering in the Gulf of Mexico.  Within hours of me asking what the impact of this solar event would be on Katrina, it grew to a Category 5 Hurricane and absolutely destroyed New Orleans.  At this point I have no doubt whatsoever powerful magnetic solar storms affect our weather directly.

2015 Hurricane Season: Arlene

And, we’re off!

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT ALONG THE NORTHERN GULF COAST FROM MORGAN CITY LOUISIANA TO INDIAN PASS FLORIDA. A TROPICAL STORM WATCH MEANS THAT TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE POSSIBLE IN THE WATCH AREA DURING THE NEXT 36 HR.

Now, to put this in perspective:

Year Hurricane Began
2016 Alex 12-Jan
2017 Arlene 19-Apr
2003 Ana 24-Apr
2015 Ana 8-May
2007 Andrea 9-May
2012 Alberto 19-May
2008 Arthur 31-May
1995 Allison 3-Jun
2001 Allison 5-Jun
2013 Andrea 5-Jun
2005 Arlene 10-Jun
2006 Alberto 10-Jun
1999 Arlene 11-Jun
1996 Arthur 17-Jun
2010 Alex 25-Jun
2011 Arlene 28-Jun
1997 Ana 30-Jun
2014 Arthur 1-Jul
2002 Arthur 14-Jul
1998 Alex 27-Jul
2004 Alex 31-Jul
2000 Alberto 3-Aug

Some clamor was made over Adrian being unusually early, but it fizzled out.  Just as it should.  The first actually named tropical storm, Arlene, arrived pretty much on cue.

 

UPDATE: 7/25/2017: Just for chucks and giggles I updated the list to include more modern information. One year was definitely a fluke, all the rest falling pretty much in the normal range. Al Gore’s prognosis of more frequent and stronger hurricanes is as wrong as everything else he predicted.